[4][6], Beatrix's parents lived comfortably at 2 Bolton Gardens, West Brompton, where Helen Beatrix was born on 28 July 1866 and her brother Walter Bertram on 14 March 1872. In 2015 a manuscript for an unpublished book was discovered by Jo Hanks, a publisher at Penguin Random House Children's Books, in the Victoria and Albert Museum archive. The central office of the National Trust in Swindon was named "Heelis" in 2005 in her memory. With both parents having a keen interest in the countryside, Potter and her brother Walter spent most summers during their childhood in Scotland, where they explored the wildlife and spent hours drawing the animals they found. First drawn to fungi because of their colours and evanescence in nature and her delight in painting them, her interest deepened after meeting Charles McIntosh, a revered naturalist and amateur mycologist, during a summer holiday in Dunkeld in Perthshire in 1892. With William Heelis acting for her, she bought contiguous pasture, and in 1909 the 20 acres (8.1 ha) Castle Farm across the road from Hill Top Farm. She was a student of the classic fairy tales of Western Europe. At last her own woman, Potter settled into the partnerships that shaped the rest of her life: her country solicitor husband and his large family, her farms, the Sawrey community and the predictable rounds of country life. It was Annie who later suggested that these letters might make good children's books. Beatrix wasn't Potter's real first name. Encyclopaedia Britannica's editors oversee subject areas in which they have extensive knowledge, whether from years of experience gained by working on that content or via study for an advanced degree.... Take a trip from the land of Oz to Narnia alongside Max and Peter Rabbit to figure out how much you know about writers of children’s books. Beatrix Potter, in full Helen Beatrix Potter, (born July 28, 1866, South Kensington, Middlesex [now in Greater London], England—died December 22, 1943, Sawrey, Lancashire [now in Cumbria]), English author of children’s books, who created Peter Rabbit, Jeremy Fisher, Jemima Puddle-Duck, Mrs. Tiggy-Winkle, and other animal characters. [19] Beatrix and her brother were allowed great freedom in the country, and both children became adept students of natural history. [49] Unable to find a buyer for the work, she published it for family and friends at her own expense in December 1901. Taylor, Judy Taylor, Joyce Irene Whalley, Anne Stevenson Hobbs and Elizabeth Battrick, (1987), Brian G. Gardiner, "Beatrix Potter's fossils and her interest in Geology,". In 1913 she married her solicitor, William Heelis, and spent the last 30 years of her life extending her farm property and breeding Herdwick sheep. 107–148; Katherine Chandler, "Thoroughly Post-Victorian, Pre-Modern Beatrix. [20] Here Beatrix met Hardwicke Rawnsley, vicar of Wray and later the founding secretary of the National Trust, whose interest in the countryside and country life inspired the same in Beatrix and who was to have a lasting impact on her life.[21][22]. By the summer of 1912, Heelis had proposed marriage and Beatrix had accepted; although she did not immediately tell her parents, who once again disapproved because Heelis was only a country solicitor. [16], She and her younger brother Walter Bertram (1872–1918) grew up with few friends outside their large extended family. [3], Beatrix's father, Rupert William Potter (1832–1914), was educated at Manchester College by the Unitarian philosopher James Martineau. In her 20s that she sought to try and get her children’s book and drawings published. [32][33][34] Potter later gave her other mycological and scientific drawings to the Armitt Museum and Library in Ambleside, where mycologists still refer to them to identify fungi. [41] She studied book illustration from a young age and developed her own tastes, but the work of the picture book triumvirate Walter Crane, Kate Greenaway and Randolph Caldecott, the last an illustrator whose work was later collected by her father, was a great influence. Beatrix said she learnt to read "on" Scott, Taylor, et al. walking so steadily beside each other.” Potter wrote thirty books; the best known being her twenty-three children's tales. [24] Precocious but reserved and often bored, she was searching for more independent activities and wished to earn some money of her own while dutifully taking care of her parents, dealing with her especially demanding mother,[25] and managing their various households. In 1890, the firm of Hildesheimer and Faulkner bought several of the drawings of her rabbit Benjamin Bunny to illustrate verses by Frederic Weatherly titled A Happy Pair. During her summer trips with her parents, Potter also closely studied fungi, of which she made detailed drawings; she wrote a paper on spore germination that was read before the Linnean Society in 1897. As was common in the Victorian era, women of her class were privately educated and rarely went to university. For Beatrix Potter was a leading mycologist (someone who studies fungus) and conservationist and it was these interests that lead her to write her best-selling books. Instead, he devoted himself to photography and art. She left Hill Top and her other land to the National Trust. [36], Potter's artistic and literary interests were deeply influenced by fairies, fairy tales and fantasy. She died from heart disease at age 77. Helen Beatrix Potter (28 July 1866 – 22 December 1943) was an English writer, illustrator, mycologist and conservationist.She is famous for writing children's books with animal characters such as The Tale of Peter Rabbit.. 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